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Mr. John Clay, whose blood runs a royal red, can also be seen in these previous issues of Electro-Graphic Monthly courtesy of her literary agent David McAllister:

January 2004 . . .
His letter of introduction

February 2004 . . .
Regarding Beggars

March 2004 . . .
Regarding John Clay's Reputation

April 2004 . . .
Regarding Non-English Liasons

May 2004 . . .
Regarding . . . Vampires?

June 2004 . . .
Regarding the arrest of Sebastian Moran

July 2004 . . .
Regarding items stolen from Baker Street

September 2004 . . .
Regarding Dr. Watson's Household Staff

A Letter From Mr. John Clay
Regarding The Export of Crime

Dear DLL'ers,

As I understand the question, I am fully in favor of exporting convicts. They should be considered some of Britain's premium exports; as we have the highest class criminals going, compared with the poorly-educated, ill-bred foreign varieties. The question then becomes: Where? Convicts should be sent to the place most closely associated with their crime. For instance, if someone were, purely for the sake of argument, convicted of the attempted theft of French gold coins; then he, should be sent to the Gold Coast of France, ie the French Riviera, at government expense, there to ponder his iniquities for a season or two. Perhaps a confinement to Monaco amid a high concentration of Napoleons D'Or and Belles Filles would make him suffer the torments of the damned, so he would learn never to commit such dastardly acts again. Room and board commensurate with the social standing of the benighted criminal must be provided as well. It would be "cruel and unusual punishment" as our American friends might say, to deny champagne and caviar to someone whose birthright demands such as a quotidian diet. Is this too high a price to pay for the rehabilitation of the noblely convicted? If you don't agree to France, and want to stay in the 'Empire, then perhaps the Bahamas will do.

Yours, etc.
J. Clay, Esq.